A Bangle Bracelet Made From A Paracord Grommet And A Turk’s Head Knot


A three strand grommet and a Turk's Head knot make a very handsome bangle bracelet.

A three strand grommet and a Turk's Head knot make a very handsome bangle bracelet.

Now that I have broken the string of flashlight pictures, it looks like I have fallen into another series. This time bracelets are the blue plate special.

In my last post I gave my motivations for making bracelets out of knotwork. I won’t repeat it here; it is in the post below, and one day earlier, than this one.

The knots used on this bracelet were:

The hoop of the bracelet is made of a three strand grommet, but it has a secret. To both add body, and make it more stable, there is a fourth strand which runs straight through the middle. Because paracord never had the inherent twist built in, it doesn’t lay up like a strand from a laid rope does. Also, in this particular instance, the paracord wasn’t as tightly made as some, so it was a little limper than usual. Adding the fourth strand counteracted both these potential problems, so it seemed the prudent thing to do.

Covering the ends of the strands making the grommet, and dressing the bracelet, is a Turk’s Head knot. It is made of black paracord to offset the green hoop. This knot has 5 Leads X 3 Bights, doubled.

MY Lady Rose wore this to a family function, and she’s from a big family, so there were lots of folks. She received nothing but compliments. This family is one which isn’t real big on the polite lie, so I rank it more highly than if the feedback were from another group. One of the best compliments in the world of cooks isn’t the nice things people say — sometimes people are just too polite. It’s when you set the food in front of them, and as they start to eat they quit talking to concentrate on the food. We used to call it “silence followed by an empty plate”. It is the best compliment a chef/cook can get — it is never a polite lie. When I make things for My Lady Rose there is a similar rule I use. Does she ever pick it out to wear again, on her own with no prompting? If she does I rank it more highly than something she wears only once.

Thank you for coming by my site. If you see anything I can do to improve either my knots, or my site — sing out. No need to be shy about it — but if you are, there is always the “Write to me directly, Here” link on the upper right. It sends an E-Mail straight to me and doesn’t show on the blog. I will never post one of those E-Mails without the express permission of the author. I may cite or paraphrase it, but never post it. Come back again; the Gods Of Ropes And Knots seem to be in a generous mood:

William

A Bracelet Made From Stainless Steel Cable Tied Into A Turk’s Head Knot


A Turk's Head bracelet made of thin stainless steel cable

A Turk's Head bracelet made of thin stainless steel cable

If you tie knots for a hobby, one problem is coming up with new things to do. After all, stamp collectors don’t keep looking at the one stamp they saved — the ones I know have hundreds, or thousands. I like to kill at least two birds with every stone I throw. So if I can come up with something new to tie which also repays in some way, other than the actual work, that is a good thing. It has also penetrated my foggy brain that if I can tie something that My Lady Rose likes, or can use — that is a good thing also. As I say — if she’s happy, I’m happy.

I had some of this very thin stainless steel cable lying around, not doing anything in particular. After a careful survey of the concerned parties, the cable and me, it was decided that it should become a new bracelet for My Lady Rose. This was the end product.

The knots used to make this bracelet were:

The main body of the bracelet is the S.S. cable tied into a Turk’s Head of 3 Leads X 8 Bights, tripled. Because I could not tie or seize the ends under the bracelet so that they were hidden and looked good enough to pass muster I needed an alternative. Because my personal rules don’t allow the use of glues, the only solution was — another knot.

To dress the ends of the cable I clapped on a paracord Turk’s Head. This was a knot of 7 Leads X 6 Bights. As I worked it down, it became apparent that the structure of the base knot was making it do strange things. A 3 Lead Turk’s Head has a shape where the Bight on one side is directly opposite the notch between 2 Bights on the other. A mouse would have made the bracelet look too thick and unbalanced. After testing, I decided to slowly work this Turk’s Head down into a parallelogram shape which followed the profile of the bracelet’s form. It is more than acceptable; it adds to the look, instead of just not detracting.

This makes a very good bangle bracelet. It is thin enough to flex into an oval shape when you are putting it on. This lets you keep the end diameter down without making putting it on a battle. It is resilient enough that this will not harm the bracelet, even after repeated bends. One of the reasons I wanted a light knot to cover the ends, and ruled out a mouse, was becasue I didn’t want the knot to be so heavy that it always rotated to bottom dead center. The only thing which keeps this bracelet from being good enough for the angels is the roughish interior surface of the cable. The constant rotation caused by a too heavy knot would have been uncomfortable after a while. As a final fault for a big knot — the knot, the eye-catching feature, would have always been running to hide under her wrist.

This makes a very handsome bracelet; I highly recommend it as a starting design for one of your own. My Lady Rose and I long ago came to an accommodation about honesty for things like this. I do not want her to say she likes it just because I made it for her — it has been a long while since my ego was so fragile it couldn’t handle honest and thoughtful criticism. For her part — she told me that if she ever asks me if “these pants make my butt look big” and I think they do, she wants the truth. Polite lies don’t get far around here. In return for this honest input, no one gets mad, sad, or hurt if it is negative. These rules extend to all subjects — it makes things so much simpler to deal with. It might not work for everyone — but for us it is diamond. I would much rather have the honest input than the polite lie. Remember my golden rule; if she’s happy, I’m happy.

Thank you for coming by my site. I appreciate your visits, and any input or comments you care to give. Come back again; the parade of knots is building back up to speed:

William

Tutorials on-line by Mr. Loren Damewood, Turk’s Head Knots And Some Extras


Mr. Damewood makes a living tying Turk’s Head knots — in gold wire. He performs that task brilliantly, and his jewelry is outstanding.

The tutorials are for Turk’s Head knots tied in string. The method he uses is tied in hand, but unlike the method I learned, he keeps all crossings and tucks on top of his hand. At any time you can see all the weave of a knot — on the back of the hand the lines run straight and come back up in the same positions they were in when they disappeared.

I have sent people to a variety of tutorial sites on how to tie Turk’s Heads. Some of them reported back that the only one that they understood immediately was his. After they “got it” they could then go back to the other sites and use their lessons successfully.

It seemed that I should put up a notice for those people who may be having a hard time with other lessons. Before you give up, go try the tutorials here — they might speak to you in a language that you can understand.

Please note: the links below are not live links (you can’t click on them and go anywhere). Mr. Damewood preferred that I link to the front door page to his tutorials, not individually to each lesson. It’s his site, so he gets to make the rules, and I am happy to oblige his desires.

Mr.Damewood has lessons on the following Turk’s Heads:

The first 3 links have a description to go along with the pictures; they are for these knots:

  • 5 Lead X 4 Bight
  • 5 Lead X 6 Bight
  • 7 Lead X 8 Bight

The next 6 tutorial links have pictures only. If you go through the first lessons, you should be able to follow these, even without the narrative.

  • 7 Lead X 9 Bight ¬†Pictures only
  • 7 Lead X 10 Bight Pictures only
  • 7 Lead X 11 Bight Pictures only
  • 7 Lead X 12 Bight Pictures only

The 2 links below take you to a directory listing of the pictures. Click on the links, one at a time, starting at the top, and you will get a simulation of a web page with all the pictures — just slower. The lessons are for these knots:

  • 6 Lead X 5 Bight ¬†Pictures only
  • 6 Lead X 7 Bight ¬†Pictures only

Below this is a link to a tutorial on the method he uses to visualize the crossings and tucks before tackling it in wire. It is labeled:

  • “Planning a Five-lead by Six-bight Turk’s Head Knot”.

There are several assorted lessons or tips sheets under the links below those. They include some that are directly related to working in wire, but there are 2 downloadable PDF files — 1 for a 7 Lead X 6 Bight Turk’s Head, and 1 for a 7 Lead X 8 Bight knot.

There is an intriguing pictorial on a lesson for making knotted chain mail. I didn’t know what this was, so I peeked — it is a mesh of interlocking 3 Lead by 4 Bight Turk’s Head mats. They are loosely woven, so they are for looks rather than protecting you from edged or pointed weapons. You would look fine at the next Tilting Tournament — just don’t get so happy that you join in the festivities.

While you are there you should look around at his jewelry, he does some amazing Turk’s Heads in precious metals. He also has a different slant on tying Turk’s Heads because of the medium he works with.

Thank you for dropping by my site. Come back again; I hear the bands tuning up to restart the parade of knots;

William

Published in: on December 17, 2009 at 5:24 PM  Leave a Comment  
Tags: , , ,

The Viking Knit In Silver Wire: Take Two



Viking Knit In Silver Wire

"Viking Knit" courtesy and copyright of Rocio Bearer

A few days ago I wrote a post about an Internet find: a jeweler’s site with a page about a “Viking Knit”. The thing that really impressed me was this picture with the two samples done in silver wire. I won’t repeat all I said in that post, but it would repay your efforts to read both of these posts as if they were one. I thought that perhaps I had failed to explain it well enough to make it as interesting as it is. I asked the people at Rocio Fine Arts if I could use one of their pictures so that I could do a better job. The wooden base the samples are displayed on is the drawplate used to reduce the diameter and refine the shape. I don’t think fender/rib hitching gets such an elegant treatment or such classy materials very often. Mind you, I still don’t think I’m going to develop a taste for fender hitching, but I might borrow the concept to use on some knot or sinnet.
I do remember in Bruce Grant’s book on braiding rawhide horse tack that they would polish a plaited lariat by pulling it through a draw-plate. I don’t know what effect that would have on paracord — I might have to find out one day.
Thank you for dropping by. If you run across anything of interest on the net, and you do not have a place to post it, send me the link. If it fits in with my site I could post it so everybody could enjoy it. Come back again; I try to keep things moving:
William

A few days ago I wrote a post about an Internet find: a jeweler’s site with a page about a “Viking Knit”. The thing that really impressed me was this picture with the two samples done in silver wire. I won’t repeat all I said in that post, but it would repay your efforts to read both of these posts as if they were one. I thought that perhaps I had failed to explain it well enough to make it as interesting as it is. I asked the people at Rocio Fine Arts if I could use one of their pictures so that I could do a better job. The wooden base the samples are displayed on is the drawplate used to reduce the diameter and refine the shape. I don’t think fender/rib hitching gets such an elegant treatment or such classy materials very often. Mind you, I still don’t think I’m going to develop a taste for fender hitching, but I might borrow the concept to use on some knot or sinnet.
I do remember in Bruce Grant’s book on braiding rawhide horse tack that they would polish a plaited lariat by pulling it through a draw-plate. I don’t know what effect that would have on paracord — I might have to find out one day.
Thank you for dropping by. If you run across anything of interest on the net, and you do not have a place to post it, send me the link. If it fits in with my site I could post it so everybody could enjoy it. Come back again; I try to keep things moving:William

Published in: on December 4, 2009 at 11:34 PM  Comments (2)  
Tags: , ,

The Viking Knit; Fender Hitching Done In Wire Rather Than Cord


I was out looking around the void for new knot-related pages. Through a series of tangential links, I found this page on the “Viking Knit”. It is a small diameter tube made by fender hitching wire around a dowel. They show a sample with five rows of hitches. After it is hitched, it is removed from the dowel, then pulled through a series of progressively smaller holes in a wooden drawplate. This sets the knit securely, stretches it to double the length, and evens out the profile to a perfect round. I would imagine it also evens out any small imperfections in the hitching.

For some reason fender/rib hitching and its kin have never appealed to me. I have done some over the years, but given a free hand I always figured out some way to accomplish the task at hand with another knoting method. The closest thing that I find pleasurable is Spanish Grafting. This isn’t the mordida we all hear about, but ABOK #3553 & #3554.

This is a very interesting idea, and the end product is capable of being very handsome. They show some done in a silver wire that would make a fine gift for someone that has put up with living with a person addicted to knots. I have found that the occasional gift produced by tying knots goes far towards greasing the ways for your next big project. ?? Maybe I am talking about the Mordida after all — if so, it is a much more pleasant version, with much more pleasant people to deal with.

Thank you for dropping by my site. Come back again; I’ll try to keep the music lively and the marchers moving in cadence:
William

Published in: on November 26, 2009 at 2:18 AM  Leave a Comment  
Tags: , , ,

A Link To An Excellent Tutorial For A Braided Cord Bracelet


One of the sites I link to, and one of the sites I check on from time to time, has a tutorial for a braided cord bracelet. They call it the “Chesapeake Lifesaver” bracelet. Unlike the usual 3 Lead Turk’s Head knot, this one is made from a 6 strand sinnet. With a loop on one end and a knot on the other that acts as a button, you can take this one off when you want. You can use your own idea for the button or his, depending on your taste and skill.

A fine tutorial on an excellent site. Look around while you are there — many treasures lurk within.

Thanks for stopping by, see you next time:
William

Published in: on October 18, 2009 at 11:35 PM  Leave a Comment  
Tags: , , , ,

Irving Drink Asked About Paracord Bracelets … Here Is A First Shot Answer


ID: in answer to your comment… and anyone else who cares to read:

First I would like to thank Irving Drink for visiting my site, and especially for leaving a comment. It took a while to answer because I had real-world things to do, then I had to tie the knots and take the photographs. I will try to make it worth the wait.

The bracelets on the Internet fall into two broad categories. One is the Nantucket / Sailor’s / Pirate’s bracelet. The Nantucket name is used mostly in the northeast seaside states. In the south and down island, or any of the warm vacation spots south of the U.S., the customary name is a Sailor bracelet. In places where there were more surfers, it was called a Surfer’s bracelet. Thanks to the “Pirates of the Caribbean” movies it is now picking up the name of Pirate’s bracelet. I grew up in south Florida and the rule was — “whatever separates the gringos from the green”. You call it whatever ups the chance that they will buy it. They are usually made out of cotton cord, and are typically a Turk’s Head knot of 3 passes. The bight count (the number of lobes around the sides) varies with the wrist size. This one is very small, but serves as an example. You pre-tie an assortment of sizes and fit them to the customer at purchase.

Turk's Head Knot Of 3 Passes X 8 Bights

Turk's Head Knot Of 3 Passes X 8 Bights

The other bracelets are the ones popular on outdoor sportsman / survival web sites. These are usually made of square knotting. The theory is that in the woods, if you need some cord in an emergency, you unravel the bracelet to get the needed length. The cord used to tie the visible square knots is about five times the length of the knotting. So if you have a ten inch wrist, you get about fifty inches of cord. You can use the filler cords to reattach your watch, or whatever it held. The straight flat bar is called the “Solomon’s Bar” in “Ashley’s Book of Knots”. On knot sites this is considered the ultimate reference book on knots. You will see knots referred to as something like — “ABOK #2496” — the number for the Solomon Bar.

A short length of Solomon's Bar, white paracord over green fillers.

A short length of Solomon's Bar, white paracord over green fillers.

Because the sellers have to compete in a crowded market, they have to come up with new names or knots to sell. Some people are also more sophisticated buyers, because the grew up with friendship bracelets. They have seen some better knots, and expect better knots. The following pix are of four strand sinnets (braids) that are starting to show up at vacation spots. The first two are flat sinnets, with the difference being how the colors were arranged at the start. The second two sinnets are round / square sinnets with the same color starts.

A short length of 4 strand flat sinnet, with a bi-color diagonal stripe pattern.

A short length of 4 strand flat sinnet, with a bi-color diagonal stripe pattern.

A short length of 4 strand flat sinnet, with a bi-color pattern in which the color skips to the other side after two tucks.

A short length of 4 strand flat sinnet, with a bi-color pattern in which the color skips to the other side after two tucks.

A short length of 4 strand round sinnet, with a bi-color spiral pattern.

A short length of 4 strand round sinnet, with a bi-color spiral pattern.

A short length of 4 strand round sinnet with a bi-color vertical stripe pattern.

A short length of 4 strand round sinnet with a bi-color vertical stripe pattern.

This picture is of a sinnet that is starting to show up on the net. Ashley refers to it as a “three strand plat”, ABOK # 2961. It is made from two cords acting as stationary fillers, and a third that weaves over these in a figure eight motion. It has a lot more body than it seems it should. Because there are no individual knots to tie, it makes up fast — but you have to hold it securely while working, or it will un-make almost as fast.

A short length of Three Part Plat.

A short length of Three Part Plat.

To learn how to make the one of your choice, some of the knot sites in my links list have tutorials. The “Instructables” site has several tutorials on various bracelets and other knotting subjects. Many of the tutorials from other sites have migrated there. You should note that some of the knotting sites presume a fair amount of knot knowledge. The “Instructables” site assumes a lower skill level.

I have been toying with the idea of putting up some tutorials on things that aren’t already covered on the net. I don’t see any need to re-plow a field, but there are gaps in the coverage. If you can’t find a tutorial that teaches you what you need to know, drop me a line. Tell me which bracelet or knot you are interested in, and I will see about putting up a tutorial. If you are having a problem using an existing tutorial, it would help if you told me where the mis-step is. I could then be sure to give more explicit coverage to that part of the lesson.

Here are some links to sites that have tutorials covering the bracelets discussed:

“Instructables”: They have a very broad coverage because they act as a library for lessons produced by many people. This include some of those below, like the next link to Stormdrane’s site.

“Stormdrane”: This is one of the older sites in the outdoors-man type of knots. He has an excellent site and gives brief tutorials if a project introduces a new form of knot which hasn’t been covered.

“Knot Heads World Wide”
: KHWW has an extensive forum. There is also a gallery and an assortment of tutorials. They do expect a certain level of knowledge, but reward that prior work with excellent advancement built on that knowledge.

“The Pineapple Knot Forum”: This is a site populated by a very knowledgeable crowd. They are also a friendly and helpful bunch of folks.

“Alaska Museum Of Fancy Knots”: This is an old URL; this site is the seed form which the “Pineapple Knot Forum” grew. People I have sent here have been both happy and successful with it. This link is directly to a very good tutorial on the “Nantucket Bracelet”.

If you are still with me you deserve special thanks. I hope this longer than normal post has helped. If there is anything that I need to do better / differently let me know. To hear is — well … to at least take it under consideration — to seriously think about obeying. See you next time:
William