A Turk’s Head Knot Made Into A Handsome Key Fob, A Prototype That Passed All The Tests


A key fob make of Turk's Heads tied in paracord.

A key fob make of Turk's Heads tied in paracord.

I was going through my picture files to see if I had missed anything worthy of a post. Yes, I had somehow missed an an entire folder.
This key fob was the initial prototype used to develop the knots which went on to become the “Red, White, And Blue Key Fob”. I was almost paying attention to the TV one evening while I actually concentrated more on my knots. I had tied a 13 Lead X 4 Bight Turk’s Head to put on a project I was making. I tied the knot too tightly to install on its planned home. Rather than untie it  and start over, I decided to see if there was some potential use in my error. I continued to tighten the knot until it closed down on itself. Just before it got too tight to work, I led the ends out of the knot. Starting in the center I led one out of each end. I then tied a Figure Eight knot in each end, and fed them back into the center. I worked the original Turk’s Head down very tightly. The knot is so stiff that it will only flex under extreme force. It is essentially a paracord key fob/brass knuckle substitute.
In order to make it easier to use, I accented one end with a white Turk’s Head, this one of 5 Leads X 3 Bights. This knot does an admirable job of closing down over the end of a small diameter centerpiece. This makes the fob easier to see under dim light — you can also pick out the white knot by sight or touch. If you had your car/door key on that end, you could find it quickly if needed.
For a first prototype I thought this was very successful. The only things I did for the first production fob was to use red, white, and blue cord in deference to the 4th of July (thats when I made the first real one), and I made the end loops shorter so it would be more compact. I assumed, and was proven right in use, that the long loops were just too long.
These are nice fobs — they are different from the run-of-the-mill ones you normally see — and they are relatively quick and easy, once you have the system down. The only thing which makes them a 9.5 instead of a 10 is that they are so hard it is like having your keys on a wooden dowel. You do have to watch how you put it in your pocket if you are wearing blue jeans.
What do you think? How can I make these — or any of my other knots — better? I would greatly appreciate hearing your ideas.
Thank you for dropping by my site. I’ll try to keep the marchers high stepping and the music lively. One thing about this parade of knots — it keeps changing, so come back to see what’s new:
William

I was going through my picture files to see if I had missed anything worthy of a post. Yes, I had somehow missed an an entire folder.
This key fob was the initial prototype used to develop the knots which went on to become the “Red, White, And Blue Key Fob”. I was almost paying attention to the TV one evening while I actually concentrated more on my knots. I had tied a 13 Lead X 4 Bight Turk’s Head to put on a project I was making. I tied the knot too tightly to install on its planned home. Rather than untie it  and start over, I decided to see if there was some potential use in my error. I continued to tighten the knot until it closed down on itself. Just before it got too tight to work, I led the ends out of the knot. Starting in the center I led one out of each end. I then tied a Figure Eight knot in each end, and fed them back into the center. I worked the original Turk’s Head down very tightly. The knot is so stiff that it will only flex under extreme force. It is essentially a paracord key fob/brass knuckle substitute.
In order to make it easier to use, I accented one end with a white Turk’s Head, this one of 5 Leads X 3 Bights. This knot does an admirable job of closing down over the end of a small diameter centerpiece. This makes the fob easier to see under dim light — you can also pick out the white knot by sight or touch. If you had your car/door key on that end, you could find it quickly if needed.
For a first prototype I thought this was very successful. The only things I did for the first >production< fob was to use red, white, and blue cord in deference to the 4th of July (thats when I made the first real one), and I made the end loops shorter so it would be more compact. I assumed, and was proven right in use, that the long loops were just too long.
These are nice fobs — they are different from the run-of-the-mill ones you normally see — and they are relatively quick and easy, once you have the system down. The only thing which makes them a 9.5 instead of a 10 is that they are so hard it is like having your keys on a wooden dowel. You do have to watch how you put it in your pocket if you are wearing blue jeans.
What do you think? How can I make these — or any of my other knots — better? I would greatly appreciate hearing your ideas.
Thank you for dropping by my site. I’ll try to keep the marchers high stepping and the music lively. One thing about this parade of knots — it keeps changing, so come back to see what’s new:William

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Published in: on December 4, 2009 at 3:01 AM  Leave a Comment  
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