A Jar Covered In Turk’s Heads Knots, And Its Variants


Several Turk's Heads and variants cover a peanut butter jar.

Several Turk's Heads and variants cover a peanut butter jar.

After all these posts which did not feature knot-covered glass food containers of any sort, they started clamoring for equal time. Rather than abide any repercussions from the Gods Of Rope And Knots, I decided to post another bottle. This one is a peanut butter jar that shall remain brand-less. I did like the contents, I just hate receiving legal mailings.

The knots used on this bottle are:

From the top, a Spanish Ring knot of 2 passes.

A 3 strand grommet made from a single strand of paracord, which bears a Chinese button knot, doubled.

The next rung is actually 2 Turk’s Head knots in what I have come to call the “Flame” pattern. This name is from a similar pattern used by the what is now called the First Nations. Each is a 3 lead X 14 Bight knot. The bights on the near sides are woven through each other — this auto-magically produces the pattern, with little nudging.

The wide black ring in the center is a Turk’s Head knot of 9 Leads X 10 Bights, doubled, in black paracord.

The white ring at the bottom is a 7 Lead X 6 Bight Turk’s Head, doubled, in paracord.

I find that this makes an attractive covering — a definite upgrade from bare glass. It also makes the jar much easier to hold — a high friction surface that is even enough to feel comfortable.

I have used the flame pattern before, the first time on this hot sauce bottle. Then I used it on this bottle, but I linked a center knot to the two on either side. I think it looks great — but then I tied it, so I may be biased.

Maybe now the Gods Of Knots, and these bottle / jars, will let me sleep.

Thank you for coming by my site. I hope you found your time well repaid. If you can think of any way to improve the experience, please let me know. See you next time you drop by:
William

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