A Top Down Close-Up Of One Of The White Wedding Roses Made From Nested Turk’s Head Knots



A top down close-up of a white rose made from Turk's Head knots.

A top down close-up of a white rose made from Turk's Head knots.

A gentleman residing overseas used the “Direct Message” link to make a request. He shall therefore remain nameless — but I am happy to comply with his desires. He wanted a detail shot of one of the large white roses, preferably top down. Luckily I had taken a couple of extra shots when I still had the wedding roses I made for a friend of My Lady Rose in hand.

To recap for those who came in after the opening credit roll, these roses were made by nesting different-sized Turk’s Head knots. The difference in size was achieved by tying knots with differing Lead and Bight counts. Also, some of the knots were of the same count, but were made with more passes. Some of the outer knots were tied with a Herringbone/Pineapple interweave that stopped short of the top rim. This allowed me to add strength and body to the knot where needed. Because I stopped the interweave short of the top edge, a casual observer would see no difference. The pollen-bearing stamen was imitated with a short tassel of embroidery floss.

Like all my knotted structures it had to comply with my self-appointed rules: no mandrel, no wire supports, no glue, no hidden tricks other than the knots themselves. The only things allowed other than the cords which form the main structure are other cordage add-ins, like the floss/stamen trick. I do allow myself some thread or twine used as seizings or sewing as a consolidating and bracing material. There is a limit to how much of this I consider sporting. Most of the actual structure for these roses comes from the paracord itself.

Mind you, unless the end user is another knot tyer I do not expect them to know or care about such things. For regular people you can only expect them to care about looks, and if applicable, function. I normally don’t even mention these arcane tidbits of knot tying lore.

Thank you for coming by my site. If you can think of any way I can improve my knots, or my site, please let me know. I greatly appreciate your visits, and any input you give me. Come back again; the  parade of knots goes on, and on, and on:

William

Published in: on December 25, 2009 at 7:28 PM  Leave a Comment  
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Turk’s Head Wedding Roses In The Wild


The roses packed for delivery to the cake decorators.

The roses packed for delivery to the cake decorators.

 

The roses on, and around, the cake -- nestled among the foliage.

The roses on, and around, the cake -- nestled among the foliage.

 

These are the wedding roses I made from paracord. They were made by nesting Turk’s Head knots and a couple of Pineapple interweaves into blossoms and buds. The knotted leaves and stems were made from sinnets of green paracord. The foliage on the table is the real thing, gathered from living plants. The roses among the leaves on the table are the ones I made. As far as I can tell, they used only a couple of the plaited leaves on the cake as props to steady the roses. The happy couple was happy with my roses — enough to carry them to reuse on another ceremony, to be held wherever the rest of the families live.

Rather than repeat the things I said when I first posted them, these are the links to those posts:

A top down shot of the larger blossoms from the wedding roses.

A white rose with buds and leaves from the wedding set.

Detail of red roses from the wedding set.

Detail of pink roses from the wedding set.

I also made some Turk’s Head roses a while ago for My Lady Rose. She wore these on a hat for a “Run for the Roses” best hat contest — she won going away.

This is the main stem of roses from the hat.

A top down detail of the big rose from the hat set.

I also made a bracelet with a small blossom and two leaves on it for this outfit — as near as I can tell, the Gods Of Ropes And Knots stole them late on some moonless night.

At this point there is no way that I will ever be able to quit making these roses — of course there are worse things to have to do, or be known for. The real hard part is going to be making them better every time.

I am open to any suggestions on how I can improve them. Any assistance will be greatly appreciated.

Thank you for coming by my site. I hope you enjoyed your visit; come back soon:
William

Published in: on November 21, 2009 at 1:52 AM  Leave a Comment  
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A List Of Links To Posts About Turk’s Head Roses On My Site


I have several posts now that show the various roses I thought to take pictures of — not all I’ve tied, just all I shot. The links are in this list, oldest first:

The red roses from the hat My Lady Rose wore to the local run for the roses, annual, best hat contest.

A top down detail of the big rose from the hat set.

A top down shot of the larger blossoms from the wedding roses.

A white rose with buds and leaves form the wedding set.

Detail of red roses from the wedding set.

Detail of pink roses from the wedding set.

I can only imagine this list will grow over time. I already have a request for more roses; I don’t think that will change in the future. I may as well start keeping stock on hand.

I hope you profited from your visit to my site. Pleasure and/or learning, either or both as you like. Come back again; as parade master I’ll try to keep it interesting:
William

Pink Roses From The Wedding Collection; Made From Turk’s Heads Of Paracord


Three pink roses made of Turk's Head knots tied in paracord.

Three pink roses made of Turk's Head knots tied in paracord.

 

Detail of two pink roses made of paracord Turk's Heads.

Detail of two pink roses made of paracord Turk's Heads.

 

This is the last of the planned detail shots for “The Wedding Roses”. The red roses look the best in person, but the pink ones give them a run for their money in photographs.

At this point in my knot tying and/or life, I am inextricably linked to these rose knots. I will be making them from now on, if the response so far is to become the rule.

One thing I noticed you can’t see in the pictures is that on some of the calyx or the outside knot of petals is actually a Pineapple interweave. I did this so that they would have more body and hold their shape better than a loosely worked Turk’s Head would. It works very well, and adds to the looks.

Given that I will be making more of these, I should formalize the process. The next thing to try will be using interweaves in the body of the blossom. This would allow me to make them looser, while at the same time maintaining structural strength. The only gimmick would be to use the “Lone Star knot” structure so the petals would still be individual curves. A true Pineapple knot interweave carried to the edge that shows would be too straight of an edge.

I would like your thoughts on these knots. Do you think they are good enough — that I should leave well enough alone? Can you think of an improvement; if so what is it? Should I make them in poke-a-dots of purple and orange?

Thank you for coming by my site. I hope you enjoyed your visit. Come back again; the parade is probably going back to some bottles again. If you see me, wave:
William

Published in: on November 10, 2009 at 1:48 AM  Leave a Comment  
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Red Roses From The Wedding Collection, Made From Turk’s Heads


Two red roses made from Turk's Head knots, part of the wedding collection.

Two red roses made from Turk's Head knots, part of the wedding collection.

Turk's Head knots used to make three red roses, for the wedding collection.

Turk's Head knots used to make three red roses, for the wedding collection.

 

 

The parade of roses continues, with red roses. Like the other flowers in this set, they are made entirely of cordage. Paracord is the main line used, with golden yellow embroidery floss for the pollen in the center of each rose. The green Turk’s Head knot which forms the calyx on the bottom is tacked on with some thread, to make sure it holds its shape.

In another post I showed a top down look at the open blossoms.

The post here is of a white blossom with buds and leaves arranged around it.

The wedding is over and the roses were a hit. The bride and groom packed them up to take with them to another ceremony. I figure they would have left them if they didn’t like them. This is another version of the only true compliment to a cook — silence while they eat, followed by empty plates. People who tie knots may know and appreciate some of the hidden problems, and the level of work involved in making a knot look right. The look of your work, and how it does the job, is all that matters to the happy couple, and rightly so.

Thank you for coming by my site. Let me know what you think; I will greatly appreciate it:
William

Published in: on November 8, 2009 at 10:44 AM  Leave a Comment  
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A White Rose From The Wedding Collection, Turk’s Head Blossom & Braided Leaves.


Turk's Head knots in white paracord make handsome roses.

Turk's Head knots in white paracord make handsome roses.

 

 

This is a single rose, from a set I made for a wedding. The rose itself is made from nested Turk’s Head knots. Each knot is made a little larger than the last by either increasing the Lead & Bight count, or by following the original pass of the knot more times.

The blossoms were made by the same method, but they were worked much tighter.

The leaves were plaited, starting from the tip, with integral stems. The leaves have either 4 or 6 strands. The stems are all of 4 strand round sinnet, while the large leaves use 2 of the original strands for a core. Some of the small leaves were worked loosely so that when you were arranging them you could make them narrower, wider, or twisted. The ring between the leaf and the stem is to keep this looseness in the leaf. The other leaves also have a ring around the stem, just so all of them look the same.

None of the items in this picture are connected. I didn’t know how the decorator was going to use them on the cake, so I left them loose to allow maximum flexibility in their arrangement.

Please let me know what you think. How can I make them better for the next time?

Thank you for taking the time to visit my site. Drop by again when you can; I try to keep the parade moving, and as interesting as I can make it:
William

Published in: on November 6, 2009 at 11:13 PM  Leave a Comment  
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Roses For A Wedding Cake, Made Of Turk’s Head Knots


Roses made out of cord and thread tied into Turk's Head knots.

Roses made out of cord and thread tied into Turk's Head knots.

The cat is now officially out of the bag. The pink roses explain that pink drink coaster. The unofficial name that pink thing contest is over — the winner will be notified by getting a pink thing.

My Lady Rose has a friend, who has a friend who is getting married. This friend was looking for something unusual to give as a gift. Because she has visited my site she knew about the roses I make for My Lady Rose. She thought they would be a nice and novel gift. My Lady Rose agreed. I did the macho thing any manly man should do when faced by two women united in purpose — I quickly threw in the towel. This artful move meant that I would have the perfect excuse to sit and tie knots.

This is the first of a series of photos I took before I sent the roses off to meet their fate. Because of my self-imposed rules, I make these out of cords and a little thread. I don’t use glue, paste, forms, wire, or any supports of any kind. Paracord and embroidery floss and a little thread are all there is behind the glamour.

Each flower is made by layering different sized Turk’s Head knots. I tie them in hand and then work them down around the center knot. The yellow floss stands in for the pollen bearing stamen. Each bloom or blossom also has a green Turk’s Head as a base. This makes them look¬† better, and also covers up the bottom of the knots which form the petals. I didn’t make stems / branches for these because they are slated to top the cake, in place of the little plastic people. I did plait up some leaves on separate stems so they could have them to dress the cake. Pictures of individual blooms will follow these over the next few days.

Thank you for coming by my site. I hope you have been rewarded adequately enough for you to return. If you know of any way I could improve either my site or my knotting skills, I would very much like to hear from you. Come back again; I’ll try to keep the parade moving:
William

Published in: on November 5, 2009 at 1:26 AM  Leave a Comment  
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